Development Behind Ethereum 2.0

Development Behind Ethereum 2.0

Darren Langley, the Senior Developer at Rocket Pool, introduces the developer community behind Ethereum

In his today’s article on Medium, Darren Langley of Rocket Pool explains how independent developers from all over the world come together to build Ethereum 2.0. Here is our short overview of the article.

Once fully delivered, Ethereum 2.0 will combine the following key projects:

  • Proof-of-Stake: beacon chain (a side chain that stores hashes of the main chain and provides distributed randomness for sharding) and Casper FFG (a hybrid PoW / PoS consensus where every 50th PoW-mined block is finalized by PoS, making the chain irrevertible),
  • Sharding (solves the scaling problem by dividing the chain into fragments, shards),
  • and eWASM (a major upgrade to the Ethereum Virtual Machine).

Development

A large portion of the developer community are building and improving client implementations of Ethereum such as geth, Parity, Aleth, Trinity, Harmony.

However, there is an entire ecosystem of open-source software projects working on other aspects of Ethereum:

Research

At the same time, there is a lot of research being conducted on a variety of topics. These topics are published and discussed on the Ethereum research website. These research topics include:

A thoroughly investigated topic becomes a specification, and the implementation teams can then include it in their clients.

Some of the clients that are working on the beacon chain and sharding specifications include Prysm, Lighthouse, Nimbus, Lodestar, Harmony, Pantheon, and Trinity.

eWASM?

The eWASM project is working on compatibility with the Ethereum Virtual Machine. There is still a lot of investigations to be done in this area, but Langley thinks that,

  • Ethereum 2.0 will use a delayed execution model, whereas the current EVM executes contract immediately when a transaction is processed;
  • Shards will only be responsible for ordering and storing transactions;
  • A second-layer execution process will read transactions, execute code, and write back results.
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